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Geochemistry of an Aptian bedded chert succession from the deep Pacific basin: New insights into Cretaceous oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 1a

By
Junichiro Kuroda
Junichiro Kuroda
Department of Biogeochemistry, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan
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Natsuko Ihoriya
Natsuko Ihoriya
Department of Earth Sciences, Graduate School of Science & Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577, Japan
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Rie S. Hori
Rie S. Hori
Department of Earth Sciences, Graduate School of Science & Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577, Japan
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Nanako O. Ogawa
Nanako O. Ogawa
Department of Biogeochemistry, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan
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Minoru Ikehara
Minoru Ikehara
Center for Advanced Marine Core Research, Kochi University, Nankoku 783-8502, Japan
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Masaharu Tanimizu
Masaharu Tanimizu
Kochi Core Institute, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Nankoku 783-8502, Japan
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Naohiko Ohkouchi
Naohiko Ohkouchi
Department of Biogeochemistry, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan
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Published:
May 01, 2015

We present a comprehensive data set of organic and inorganic geochemistry from a lower Cretaceous pelagic bedded chert succession of the Shimanto accretionary belt in the Yokonami Peninsula (Kochi, Japan). Based on stable isotopic composition of total organic carbon (δ13Corg), in conjunction with radiolarian biostratigraphic data, we propose that a 1.3-m-thick interval within the examined section is correlative with Tethyan Selli Level (Apennines, Italy), a sedimentary expression of oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 1a. Specifically, the δ13Corg record illustrates a discernible negative shift and subsequent positive excursions upsection, a pattern that resembles the typical δ13Corg pattern across OAE 1a reported from various sites such as the Mediterranean Tethys and Pacific seamount flanks. Our δ13Corg record from the deep Pacific basin supports the idea that the δ13C variation across OAE 1a was induced by a significant perturbation of global carbon cycle. The slight increase in total organic carbon contents of sediment deposited during OAE 1a suggests slight or no expansion of oxygen-deficient water mass in the overlying water column. Rare earth elements and lead isotopic compositions indicate relatively higher contributions of volcanic or hydrothermally altered components before and after OAE 1a. The volcanic or hydrothermal source may be associated with emplacement of the Ontong Java Plateau during the early Aptian, or tectonically induced hydrothermal alteration associated with the formation of the accretionary complex.

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GSA Special Papers

The Origin, Evolution, and Environmental Impact of Oceanic Large Igneous Provinces

Clive R. Neal
Clive R. Neal
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, USA
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William W. Sager
William W. Sager
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-5007, USA
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Takashi Sano
Takashi Sano
Department of Geology and Paleontology, National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba 305-0005, Japan
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Elisabetta Erba
Elisabetta Erba
Department of Earth Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
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Geological Society of America
Volume
511
ISBN print:
9780813725116
Publication date:
May 01, 2015

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