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Topographic expression of the Danger Islands Troughs and implications for the tectonic evolution of the Manihiki Plateau, western equatorial Pacific Ocean

By
Masao Nakanishi
Masao Nakanishi
Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba City, Chiba 263-8522, Japan
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Yasuyuki Nakamura
Yasuyuki Nakamura
Research and Development Center for Earthquake and Tsunami, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25, Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 236-0001, Japan
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Millard F. Coffin
Millard F. Coffin
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 129, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
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Kaj Hoernle
Kaj Hoernle
GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Wischhofstrasse 13, 24148 Kiel, Germany
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Reinhard Werner
Reinhard Werner
GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Wischhofstrasse 13, 24148 Kiel, Germany
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Published:
May 01, 2015

The Manihiki Plateau in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean is a Cretaceous Large Igneous Province. Several studies have proposed that the Manihiki Plateau was formed by the same mantle plume that formed the Ontong Java and Hikurangi plateaus ca. 125 Ma. Recent multibeam bathymetric surveys of the Manihiki Plateau reveal the morphology of the Danger Islands Troughs (DIT), Suvarov Trough, which are systems of deep troughs within the plateau. The troughs divide the Manihiki Plateau into three distinct provinces, the North Plateau, the Western Plateaus, and the High Plateau. The DIT between the High Plateau and Western Plateaus comprises four en echelon troughs. With one exception, all segments of the DIT are bordered by steep escarpments, to 1500 m high. The basins of the DIT are smooth. Elongated northeast-southwest–striking scarps are common in the southernmost DIT and at the junction between the DIT and Suvarov Trough. The features revealed by the new bathymetric data indicate that a sinistral strike-slip tectonic environment formed the DIT during the break-up into the Manihiki and Hikurangi plateaus, whereas the Suvarov Trough developed after the formation of the DIT.

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GSA Special Papers

The Origin, Evolution, and Environmental Impact of Oceanic Large Igneous Provinces

Clive R. Neal
Clive R. Neal
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, USA
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William W. Sager
William W. Sager
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-5007, USA
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Takashi Sano
Takashi Sano
Department of Geology and Paleontology, National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba 305-0005, Japan
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Elisabetta Erba
Elisabetta Erba
Department of Earth Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
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Geological Society of America
Volume
511
ISBN print:
9780813725116
Publication date:
May 01, 2015

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