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Boron and chlorine contents of basalts from the Shatsky Rise, IODP Expedition 324: Implications for the alteration of oceanic plateaus

By
Masaya Miyoshi
Masaya Miyoshi
Geological Laboratory, Faculty of Education and Regional Studies, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fukui 910-8507, Japan
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Takashi Sano
Takashi Sano
Department of Geology and Paleontology, National Museum of Nature and Science, 4-1-1 Amakubo, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0005, Japan
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Kenji Shimizu
Kenji Shimizu
Department of Solid Earth Geochemistry, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), 2-15 Natsushima, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-0061, Japan
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Adélie Delacour
Adélie Delacour
Université de Lyon, Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, UJM-UBP-CNRS-IRD, 23 rue Dr. Paul Michelon, 42023 Saint Etienne, France
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Toshiaki Hasenaka
Toshiaki Hasenaka
Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555, Japan
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Yasushi Mori
Yasushi Mori
Kitakyushu Museum of Natural History and Human History, 2-4-1 Higashida, Yahatahigashi-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 805-0071, Japan
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Takaaki Fukuoka
Takaaki Fukuoka
Faculty of Geo-environmental Science, Rissho University, 1700 Magechi, Kumagaya, Saitama 360-0914, Japan
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Published:
May 01, 2015

Oceanic plateaus are formed by a large volume of basaltic rocks on top of the oceanic lithosphere. Alteration of these basalt lava piles leads to significant chemical element exchanges between mantle and oceans that can strongly influence chemical budget. Here we report boron (B), chlorine (Cl), and other element concentrations in basalt samples from the Shatsky Rise to define alteration processes and to estimate the significance of oceanic plateaus in storing these elements. Sampling includes 121 basaltic lavas and 92 fresh glasses collected at various depths from Holes U1346A, U1347A, U1349A, and U1350A during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 324. Loss on ignition (LOI) results indicate that alteration affected basalts from the summit sites (U1346 and U1349) more deeply than those from the flank sites (U1347 and U1350). The positive correlations between B, K, and LOI observed in the basalts indicate that low-temperature seawater-derived alteration was the predominant process affecting Shatsky Rise basalts. This is confirmed by the elevated B/K and modest Cl/K ratios of these altered basalts relative to the fresh glasses. In addition, B concentrations in the summit basalts (~132 ppm) are significantly higher than those in normal altered oceanic crust and are likely related to the presence of illite. This suggests that the Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau may be an important sink for B in the Pacific oceanic crust.

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GSA Special Papers

The Origin, Evolution, and Environmental Impact of Oceanic Large Igneous Provinces

Clive R. Neal
Clive R. Neal
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, USA
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William W. Sager
William W. Sager
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-5007, USA
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Takashi Sano
Takashi Sano
Department of Geology and Paleontology, National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba 305-0005, Japan
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Elisabetta Erba
Elisabetta Erba
Department of Earth Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
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Geological Society of America
Volume
511
ISBN print:
9780813725116
Publication date:
May 01, 2015

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