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Extract from beginning of chapter:

RECEPTION OF THE C.I.P.W. IGNEOUS ROCK CLASSIFICATION1

It was to be expected that so radical a departure from current petrographical usage, and so novel a nomenclature as that proposed for the new system of rock classification, which was essentially a classification of magmas, would be very differently received by different petrographers according to their own views of igneous rocks and their individual temperaments. Indeed, we were not surprised that by some it was not received at all. “For,” as Moses exclaimed, “their rock is not as our Rock, even our enemies themselves being judges.”2 They did not even acknowledge the receipt of the volume sent to them; at least, in a few notable instances no acknowledgment ever reached us.

Canada

Anticipating the shock, which might be occasioned in the minds of some petrographers, by the first sight of the full-fledged scheme, we wrote letters to a number of them stating the general plan of the undertaking and the method of its development. To Frank Adams, who had been taken into our confidence at an earlier period and, but for his inability to take part in our frequent conferences, would have been included in our committee, we submitted a draft of the complete proposition. His comment was:3

The whole scheme is excellently set forth and the proposed classification seems to me to be good. Of course, as we all grumble at the introduction of new terms in the present classification, the setting forth of an entirely new series of names will

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