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Book Chapter

Continuous subsidence associated with the long-lasting eruption of Arenal Volcano (Costa Rica) observed by dry-tilt stations

By
Mauricio M. Mora
Mauricio M. Mora
Escuela Centroamericana de Geología, Universidad de Costa Rica, Apdo. 214-2060, Costa Rica
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Philippe Lesage
Philippe Lesage
Insitut des Sciences de la Terre, CNRS, Université de Savoie, 73376 Le Bourget-du-Lac Cedex, France
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Fabien Albino
Fabien Albino
Royal Museum for Central Africa, Department of Earth Sciences, Leuvensesteenweg 13, 3080 Tervuren, Belgium
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Gerardo J. Soto
Gerardo J. Soto
Área de Amenazas y Auscultación Sísmica y Volcánica, Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE), Apdo. 10032-1000, Costa Rica, and Terra Cognita Consultores S.A., Apdo 360-2350, Costa Rica
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Guillermo E. Alvarado
Guillermo E. Alvarado
Área de Amenazas y Auscultación Sísmica y Volcánica, Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE), Apdo. 10032-1000, Costa Rica
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Published:
November 01, 2013

Arenal Volcano is a small (~1750 m above sea level, ~10 km3) stratovolcano that continuously erupted between July 1968 and October 2010. During this long-lasting eruption (over 42 yr), a large volume of material—~5.6 × 108 m3 of dense rock equivalent—has been extruded and has produced a thick and extended lava field, mainly on the western flank of the edifice. Measurements of ground deformation obtained using a network of dry-tilt stations are presented for the period 1986–2000. They show a continuous subsidence of the volcano with maximal amplitude on the western side. The load effect of the lava field is calculated and explains the largest part of the observed tilts. Once the data are corrected by this load effect, pressure source models are not supported by the observations and by quality criteria on the models. Although the dry-tilt data from Arenal Volcano give limited constraints on the deformation models, they are representative of a long period of activity that cannot be recovered by other means. Moreover, the corresponding interpretative model is consistent with results obtained by geotechnical studies and modern ground deformation methods like interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR).

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GSA Special Papers

Understanding Open-Vent Volcanism and Related Hazards

William I. Rose
William I. Rose
Geological Engineering & Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931, USA
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José Luis Palma
José Luis Palma
Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad de Concepción, Victor Lamas 1290, Concepción, Chile
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Hugo Delgado Granados
Hugo Delgado Granados
Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Circuito Científico, C.U. Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F.
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Nick Varley
Nick Varley
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Avenida Universidad 333, Colonia Las Víboras, C.P. 28040, Colima, México
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Geological Society of America
Volume
498
ISBN print:
9780813724980
Publication date:
November 01, 2013

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