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Geometry and kinematics of the eastern Lake Mead fault system in the Virgin Mountains, Nevada and Arizona

By
L. Sue Beard
L. Sue Beard
U.S. Geological Survey, 2255 N. Gemini Drive, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001, USA
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David J. Campagna
David J. Campagna
Campagna & Associates, LLC, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185-4442, USA
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R. Ernest Anderson
R. Ernest Anderson
U.S. Geological Survey, P.O. Box 347, Kernville, California 93238, USA
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Published:
June 01, 2010

The Lake Mead fault system is a northeast-striking, 130-km-long zone of left-slip in the southeast Great Basin, active from before 16 Ma to Quaternary time. The northeast end of the Lake Mead fault system in the Virgin Mountains of southeast Nevada and northwest Arizona forms a partitioned strain field comprising kinematically linked northeast-striking left-lateral faults, north-striking normal faults, and northwest-striking right-lateral faults. Major faults bound large structural blocks whose internal strain reflects their position within a left step-over of the left-lateral faults. Two north-striking large-displacement normal faults, the Lakeside Mine segment of the South Virgin–White Hills detachment fault and the Piedmont fault, intersect the left step-over from the southwest and northeast, respectively. The left step-over in the Lake Mead fault system therefore corresponds to a right-step in the regional normal fault system.

Within the left step-over, displacement transfer between the left-lateral faults and linked normal faults occurs near their junctions, where the left-lateral faults become oblique and normal fault displacement decreases away from the junction. Southward from the center of the step-over in the Virgin Mountains, down-to-the-west normal faults splay northward from left-lateral faults, whereas north and east of the center, down-to-the-east normal faults splay southward from left-lateral faults. Minimum slip is thus in the central part of the left step-over, between east-directed slip to the north and west-directed slip to the south. Attenuation faults parallel or subparallel to bedding cut Lower Paleozoic rocks and are inferred to be early structures that accommodated footwall uplift during the initial stages of extension.

Fault-slip data indicate oblique extensional strain within the left step-over in the South Virgin Mountains, manifested as east-west extension; shortening is partitioned between vertical for extension-dominated structural blocks and south-directed for strike-slip faults. Strike-slip faults are oblique to the extension direction due to structural inheritance from NE-striking fabrics in Proterozoic crystalline basement rocks.

We hypothesize that (1) during early phases of deformation oblique extension was partitioned to form east-west–extended domains bounded by left-lateral faults of the Lake Mead fault system, from ca. 16 to 14 Ma. (2) Beginning ca. 13 Ma, increased south-directed shortening impinged on the Virgin Mountains and forced uplift, faulting, and overturning along the north and west side of the Virgin Mountains. (3) By ca. 10 Ma, initiation of the younger Hen Spring to Hamblin Bay fault segment of the Lake Mead fault system accommodated westward tectonic escape, and the focus of south-directed shortening transferred to the western Lake Mead region. The shift from early partitioned oblique extension to south-directed shortening may have resulted from initiation of right-lateral shear of the eastern Walker Lane to the west coupled with left-lateral shear along the eastern margin of the Great Basin.

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GSA Special Papers

Miocene Tectonics of the Lake Mead Region, Central Basin and Range

Paul J. Umhoefer
Paul J. Umhoefer
Department of Geology, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA
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L. Sue Beard
L. Sue Beard
U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA
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Melissa A. Lamb
Melissa A. Lamb
Geology Department, University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
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Geological Society of America
Volume
463
ISBN print:
9780813724638
Publication date:
June 01, 2010

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