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Geologic map of Lake Mead and surrounding regions, southern Nevada, southwestern Utah, and northwestern Arizona

By
Tracey J. Felger
Tracey J. Felger
U.S. Geological Survey, 2255 N. Gemini Drive, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001, USA
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L. Sue Beard
L. Sue Beard
U.S. Geological Survey, 2255 N. Gemini Drive, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001, USA
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Published:
June 01, 2010

Regional stratigraphic units and structural features of the Lake Mead region are presented as a 1:250,000 scale map, and as a Geographic Information System database. The map, which was compiled from existing geologic maps of various scales, depicts geologic units, bedding and foliation attitudes, faults and folds. Units and structural features were generalized to highlight the regional stratigraphic and tectonic aspects of the geology of the Lake Mead region. This map was prepared in support of the papers presented in this volume, Special Paper 463, as well as to facilitate future investigations in the region.

Stratigraphic units exposed within the area record 1800 million years of geologic history and include Proterozoic crystalline rocks, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, Cenozoic volcanic and intrusive rocks, sedimentary rocks and surficial deposits. Following passive margin sedimentation in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic, late Mesozoic (Sevier) thrusting and Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary compression produced major folding, reverse faulting, and thrust faulting in the Basin and Range, and resulted in regional uplift and monoclinal folding in the Colorado Plateau. Cenozoic extensional deformation, accompanied by sedimentation and volcanism, resulted in large-magnitude high- and low-angle normal faulting and strike-slip faulting in the Basin and Range; on the Colorado Plateau, extension produced north-trending high-angle normal faults. The latest history includes integration of the Colorado River system, dissection, development of alluvial fans, extensive pediment surfaces, and young faulting.

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Contents

GSA Special Papers

Miocene Tectonics of the Lake Mead Region, Central Basin and Range

Paul J. Umhoefer
Paul J. Umhoefer
Department of Geology, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA
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L. Sue Beard
L. Sue Beard
U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA
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Melissa A. Lamb
Melissa A. Lamb
Geology Department, University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
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Geological Society of America
Volume
463
ISBN print:
9780813724638
Publication date:
June 01, 2010

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