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Book Chapter

Long-term effect of seismic activities on archaeological remains: A test study from Zakynthos, Greece

By
Melek Tendürüs
Melek Tendürüs
Institute for Geo- and Bioarchaeology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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Gert Jan van Wijngaarden
Gert Jan van Wijngaarden
Amsterdam Archaeological Centre, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Turfdraagsterpad 9, 1012 XT Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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Henk Kars
Henk Kars
Institute for Geo- and Bioarchaeology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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Published:
October 01, 2010

During the archaeological and geoarchaeological surveys on the island of Zakynthos, Greece, it has been noted that the distribution and preservation of archaeological remains of Zakynthos present spatially different characteristics. In general, archaeological pottery finds and architectural remains in the eastern part of the island appear to be more fragmented and more widely distributed than in the western part of the island. Due to the high seismicity in the region, the question has come up whether a correlation between seismic activity and distribution and preservation conditions of archaeological remains exists or not. In order to investigate the mentioned relationship, we looked at the cumulative effect of continuing earthquakes for the last hundred years on the island of Zakynthos. We used ground acceleration to quantify the earthquake-induced damage. The predicted cumulative destruction intensity is presented on a map, and it illustrates that we can cautiously attribute the distribution difference of the archaeological remains with different preservation conditions to the seismic activity on the island. It is hoped that this study will initiate new scientific research into the characteristics of the distribution of archaeological remains in seismically active areas. In addition, it is to be expected that this study will contribute to in situ preservation studies relating to the long-term effect of seismic activities on the archaeological record.

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GSA Special Papers

Ancient Earthquakes

Manuel Sintubin
Manuel Sintubin
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan, Leuven, Belgium
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Iain S. Stewart
Iain S. Stewart
School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Fitzroy, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon, UK
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Tina M. Niemi
Tina M. Niemi
Department of Geosciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
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Erhan Altunel
Erhan Altunel
Department of Geological Engineering, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey
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Geological Society of America
Volume
471
ISBN print:
9780813724713
Publication date:
October 01, 2010

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