Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

A granulite-facies normal shear zone exposed in the Arunta inlier of central Australia: Implications for deep-crustal deformation during oblique divergence

By
Cheryl Waters-Tormey
Cheryl Waters-Tormey
Department of Geosciences and Natural Resources, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, North Carolina 28723, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Laurel B. Goodwin
Laurel B. Goodwin
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Basil Tikoff
Basil Tikoff
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Kathy Staffier
Kathy Staffier
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Paul Kelso
Paul Kelso
Department of Geology and Physics, Lake Superior State University, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan 49783, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2009

The Mount Hay block is a ~12-km-thick, deep continental crustal section exposed in the Arunta inlier in central Australia. The ~4-km-wide, granulite-facies (770–776 ± 38 °C) Capricorn ridge shear zone cross-cuts the dominant granulite-facies fabric of the Mount Hay block. In its present geometry, the Capricorn ridge shear zone contains a steeply south-southeast-dipping foliation, steeply east-southeast-plunging lineation, and south-side-up shear-sense indicators. When post-granulite-facies tilting is removed, the shear zone restores to a shallowly to moderately (30–50°) dipping, normal shear zone in which the lineation is oblique to the inferred Proterozoic plate boundary, suggesting oblique divergence. The field observations and reconstruction indicate that strain can be localized in the high-temperature, deep-crustal roots of extensional fault systems. This geometry of a discrete, moderately dipping, deep-crustal shear zone is consistent with simple-shear conceptual models of crustal extension.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

GSA Special Papers

Crustal Cross Sections from the Western North American Cordillera and Elsewhere: Implications for Tectonic and Petrologic Processes

Robert B. Miller
Robert B. Miller
San José State University, San José, California, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Arthur W. Snoke
Arthur W. Snoke
University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of America
Volume
456
ISBN print:
9780813724560
Publication date:
January 01, 2009

References

Related

Citing Books via

Related Book Content
Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal