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Lakes in one form or another have characterized the western Mojave Desert since at least Miocene time. The most recent of these, Lake Thompson, developed in the late Pleistocene, when it covered as much as 950 km2 and rose to at least 710 m above sea level. During Holocene time, the lake desiccated, and is now represented by Rogers, Rosamond, and Buckhorn dry lakes, which may flood up to 200 km2 during unusually wet phases. The spatial dimensions of the former lake are defined by modest geomorphic and lithostratigraphic units, mostly exposed lake beds and beach ridges interbedded...

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