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Evidence for a change in Milankovitch forcing caused by extraterrestrial events at Massignano, Italy, Eocene-Oligocene boundary GSSP

By
Rachel E Brown
Rachel E Brown
Carleton College, One North College Street, Northfield, Minnesota 55057, USA
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Christian Koeberl
Christian Koeberl
Center of Earth Sciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
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Alessandro Montanari
Alessandro Montanari
Osservatorio Geologico di Coldigioco, I-62020 Frontale di Apiro (MC), Italy
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David M Bice
David M Bice
The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Geosciences, 503 Deike Building, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
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Published:
April 01, 2009

High-resolution spectral analyses of four climate proxies from Massignano, Italy (Eocene-Oligocene boundary global stratotype section and point [GSSP]), indicate that the deposition of this rhythmically bedded sedimentary sequence was controlled by Milankovitch orbital cycles. An inverse relationship between the magnetic susceptibility record and the co-varied calcium carbonate, δ18O, and δ13C records is indicative of a climate model in which limestones represent dry/cold periods, while marly limestones represent warm/wet periods. Through pattern matching of band-pass filtered signals with the La2004 eccentricity curve, we propose an astrochronological calibration for this important time period. Constrained by three radioisotopically dated volcanic ashes and based on a band-pass version of eccentricity that exhibits expected amplitude modulations, our astrochronology yields a refined age for the Eocene-Oligocene boundary of 33.91 ± 0.05 Ma. Orbital forcing is less pronounced in the lower portion of the Massignano section (meter levels 0–15), which contains evidence of several impact events and a 2.2-m.y.-long comet/asteroid shower. We propose that substantial, nonperiodic climate alterations caused by this period of enhanced extraterrestrial activity mask the Milankovitch climate cycles. Possible mechanisms for the exaggeration of impact-related climatic changes include the ice-albedo feedback or the combined effect of impact-related atmospheric alterations with ongoing dust-particle loading associated with the comet/asteroid shower.

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Contents

GSA Special Papers

The Late Eocene Earth—Hothouse, Icehouse, and Impacts

Christian Koeberl
Christian Koeberl
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Alessandro Montanari
Alessandro Montanari
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Geological Society of America
Volume
452
ISBN print:
9780813724522
Publication date:
April 01, 2009

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