Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Geodetic constraints on contemporary deformation in the northern Walker Lane: 2. Velocity and strain rate tensor analysis

By
Corné Kreemer
Corné Kreemer
Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, and Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557-0178, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Geoffrey Blewitt
Geoffrey Blewitt
Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, and Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557-0178, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
William C Hammond
William C Hammond
Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, and Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557-0178, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
April 01, 2009

We present a velocity and strain rate model for the northern Walker Lane derived from a compilation of geodetic velocities and corrected for transient effects owing to historic earthquakes on the Central Nevada seismic belt. We find that from 37°N to 40°N, the Walker Lane is characterized by an ~100-km-wide zone with near-constant strain rates associated with ~10 mm yr−1 total motion across the zone. The strain rates depict predominantly shear deformation, but south of 39°N, the extensional component of the strain rate tensor increases and thus reflects more of a transtensional domain there. We conclude that this transtension is a kinematic consequence of the motion of the Sierra Nevada–Great Valley block, which is not parallel to its eastern margin, i.e., the eastern Sierra front, south of 39°N. While the orientations of several normal and strike-slip faults in the Walker Lane region are consistent with the strain rate model results at several places, the mode and rate at which geologic structures accommodate the deformation are less clear. Left-lateral faulting and clockwise rotations there may contribute to the accommodation of the velocity gradient tensor field, and most normal faults are properly oriented to accommodate some component of the regional shear strain, but significant additional right-lateral strike-slip faulting is required to accommodate the majority of the 10 mm yr−1 relative motion. Overall, the along-strike variation in the active tectonics of Walker Lane suggests that (1) various mechanisms are at play to accommodate the shear, (2) parts of the surface tectonics may (still) be in an early stage of development, and (3) inherited structural grain can have a dominant control on the strain accommodation mechanism.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

GSA Special Papers

Late Cenozoic Structure and Evolution of the Great Basin-Sierra Nevada Transition

John S. Oldow
John S. Oldow
Search for other works by this author on:
Patricia H. Cashman
Patricia H. Cashman
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of America
Volume
447
ISBN print:
9780813724478
Publication date:
April 01, 2009

References

Related

Citing Books via

Related Book Content
Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal