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Horizontal-to-vertical ground motion relations at short distances for four hard-rock sites in eastern Canada and implications for seismic hazard assessment

By
Allison L. Bent
Allison L. Bent
Earthquakes Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Geological Survey of Canada, 7 Observatory Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y3, Canada
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Emily J. Delahaye
Emily J. Delahaye
School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Station CSC, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P6, Canada
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Published:
January 01, 2007

Horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) ground-motion relations were determined for four long-running, three-component broadband seismograph stations situated on hard rock in eastern Canada. We focused our attention on earthquakes of magnitude 2.5 and greater at close range (<200 km) to each station because most earthquake damage results from nearby earthquakes. An H/V value of ∼2 is the general average for eastern Canada, although there are some differences from station to station. H/V in general increases with increasing frequency. There is little or no systematic variation in H/V as a function of either distance or magnitude. The H/V ratios obtained in this study are somewhat higher than previously published values. Much of the difference appears to be due to the use of different definitions of H rather than to differences in the data sets and/or methods of data processing and analysis. These results raise questions regarding the best definition for H for use in hazard assessment.

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Contents

GSA Special Papers

Continental Intraplate Earthquakes: Science, Hazard, and Policy Issues

Seth Stein
Seth Stein
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Stéphane Mazzotti
Stéphane Mazzotti
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Geological Society of America
Volume
425
ISBN print:
9780813724256
Publication date:
January 01, 2007

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