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Perhaps the most surprising result of the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Magellan mission to Venus was the preservation of ∼970 essentially pristine impact craters distributed in near-random fashion across the planet surface. The craters have been widely interpreted as evidence of near-global catastrophic volcanic resurfacing over 10–100 million years, ∼500 million years ago. This view of Venus permeates textbooks and popular science, and is rarely questioned. The view of a catastrophically resurfaced Venus emerged relatively early in Magellan mission data analysis. We revisit the question of impact crater distribution and implications for Venus's resurfacing and evolutionary processes using...

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