Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Can stone decay be chaotic?

By
Heather A. Viles
Heather A. Viles
1
School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3TB, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2005

Despite decades of study of stone decay phenomena and practical stone conservation experience, there are still great gaps in our knowledge, and it is still difficult to predict how stone decay and soiling will respond to changes in air pollution and other environmental changes. Nonlinear behavior and chaotic system dynamics have been recognized in many earth surface systems and are also relevant to stone decay phenomena. Identification of nonlinear behavior in stone decay systems should help interpret, model, and manage such systems. Several examples indicate the presence of nonlinear, and sometimes chaotic, behavior in stone decay systems. A review of sources of nonlinearity in stone decay systems illustrates that nonlinearities are common and important, with chaotic behavior sometimes resulting. Such findings illustrate the potential dangers of applying linear damage functions and the need for management efforts to take seriously nonlinearities in stone decay, due to the often complex and chaotic responses of deteriorating stonework to environmental changes.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

GSA Special Papers

Stone Decay in the Architectural Environment

Alice V. Turkington
Alice V. Turkington
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of America
Volume
390
ISBN print:
9780813723907
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal