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Liquefaction induced by historic and prehistoric earthquakes in western Puerto Rico

By
Martitia P. Tuttle
Martitia P. Tuttle
1
M. Tuttle & Associates, 128 Tibbetts Lane, Georgetown, Maine 04548, USA
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Kathleen Dyer-Williams
Kathleen Dyer-Williams
1
M. Tuttle & Associates, 128 Tibbetts Lane, Georgetown, Maine 04548, USA
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Eugene S. Schweig
Eugene S. Schweig
2
U.S. Geological Survey, 3876 Central Ave., Ste. 2, Memphis, Tennessee 38152-3050, USA
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Carol S. Prentice
Carol S. Prentice
3
U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 977, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA
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Juan Carlos Moya
Juan Carlos Moya
4
EcoGeo, LLC, 8503 Brock Cr., Austin, Texas 78745, USA
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Kathleen B. Tucker
Kathleen B. Tucker
5
CERI, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee 38152, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2005

Dozens of liquefaction features in western Puerto Rico probably formed during at least three large earthquakes since A.D. 1300. Many of the features formed during the 1918 moment magnitude (M) 7.3 event and the 1670 event, which may have been as large as M 7 and centered in the Añasco River Valley. Liquefaction features along Río Culebrinas, and possibly a few along Río Grande de Añasco, appear to have formed ca. A.D. 1300–1508 as the result of a M ≥ 6.5 earthquake. We conducted reconnaissance along Río Culebrinas, Río Grande de Añasco, and Río Guanajibo, where we found and studied numerous liquefaction features, dated organic samples occurring in association with liquefaction features, and performed liquefaction potential analysis with geotechnical data previously collected along the three rivers. Our ongoing study will provide additional information regarding the age and size distribution of liquefaction features along the western, northern, and eastern coasts and will help to improve estimates of the timing, source areas, and magnitudes of earthquakes that struck Puerto Rico during the late Holocene.

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Contents

GSA Special Papers

Active Tectonics and Seismic Hazards of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Offshore Areas

Paul Mann
Paul Mann
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Geological Society of America
Volume
385
ISBN print:
9780813723853
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

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