Skip to Main Content

  Contents   
    Page 
Table 21  1. Electrical resistivity of rocks and soils  304 
  2.1. Electrical resistivity of mineralized rocks  307 
  2.2. Electrical resistivity of specular hematite in quartz porphyry  307 
  3. Electrical resistivity of metallic sulfides  308 
  4. Electrical resistivity of some oxides and miscellaneous minerals  311 
  5. Electrical resistivity of hydrocarbons  313 
  6.1. Electrical resistivity of natural water  314 
  6.2. Electrical resistivity of saline waters  314 
  6.3. Effect of water and oil on direct current resistance of sandstone  315 
  6.4. Electrical resistivity of wet sand  315 
  6.5. Resistivity of soils and sea water measured with high-frequency alternating current  316 
  7. Dielectric constant of rocks  317 
  8. Dielectric constant of minerals  318 
  8.1. Dielectric constant of Rochelle salt, as function of temperature  318 
  Contents   
    Page 
Table 21  1. Electrical resistivity of rocks and soils  304 
  2.1. Electrical resistivity of mineralized rocks  307 
  2.2. Electrical resistivity of specular hematite in quartz porphyry  307 
  3. Electrical resistivity of metallic sulfides  308 
  4. Electrical resistivity of some oxides and miscellaneous minerals  311 
  5. Electrical resistivity of hydrocarbons  313 
  6.1. Electrical resistivity of natural water  314 
  6.2. Electrical resistivity of saline waters  314 
  6.3. Effect of water and oil on direct current resistance of sandstone  315 
  6.4. Electrical resistivity of wet sand  315 
  6.5. Resistivity of soils and sea water measured with high-frequency alternating current  316 
  7. Dielectric constant of rocks  317 
  8. Dielectric constant of minerals  318 
  8.1. Dielectric constant of Rochelle salt, as function of temperature  318 

ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

(1) Electrolytic conductors.—The electrical conductivity of rocks and soils in place is generally due almost entirely to the moisture content. With some exceptions, the solid minerals which constitute the rock or soil are good insulators. Thus, the conductivity is not an essential property of the rock or rock type; it depends not only upon the capacity of the rock to absorb water and upon the kind and structure of its pore spaces, but also upon the amount and composition of the water retained. Hence, the conductivity may depend to an important extent upon the accident of the geological and climatic environment in which the material happens to find itself. It follows that resistivities tabulated in the literature should not be used to predict the . . .

You do not currently have access to this chapter.

Figures & Tables

Contents

References

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal