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Table 17  1. Thermal conductivity of cubic single crystals  245 
  2. Conductivity of crystal powders cemented by compression to 8000 atmospheres  247 
  3. Thermal conductivity of noncubic single crystals  248 
  4. Thermal conductivity of rocks  251 
  4.1. Effect of wetting and of simple compression on the thermal conductivity of certain rocks  258 
  5. Thermal conductivity of soil, snow, ice  259 
  6. Thermal conductivity of glass  260 
  7. Conductivity of a few common metals  262 
  8. Thermal conductivity of miscellaneous materials  263 
  9. Thermal conductivity of some common liquids, as function of pressure and temperature  265 
  10. Effect of hydrostatic pressure upon the thermal conductivity of solids  266 
  Contents   
    Page 
Table 17  1. Thermal conductivity of cubic single crystals  245 
  2. Conductivity of crystal powders cemented by compression to 8000 atmospheres  247 
  3. Thermal conductivity of noncubic single crystals  248 
  4. Thermal conductivity of rocks  251 
  4.1. Effect of wetting and of simple compression on the thermal conductivity of certain rocks  258 
  5. Thermal conductivity of soil, snow, ice  259 
  6. Thermal conductivity of glass  260 
  7. Conductivity of a few common metals  262 
  8. Thermal conductivity of miscellaneous materials  263 
  9. Thermal conductivity of some common liquids, as function of pressure and temperature  265 
  10. Effect of hydrostatic pressure upon the thermal conductivity of solids  266 

In an isotropic homogeneous material the conduction of heat depends upon a single “constant” of the material, known as the thermal conductivity; this “constant” is a function of temperature, pressure, and other variables. The quantity of heat dQ conducted in unit time across an element of surface dS is given by the fundamental relation, d Q = K d T d n d S where K is the conductivity and dT/dn the gradient of the temperature in the direction of the normal to the surface element dS. Two “ c.g.s.” units of heat are in common use; the calorie (gram-calorie) and the joule; 1 calorie equals 4.185 joules. Using the centimeter, second, and Centigrade temperature scale, the corresponding units for thermal conductivity are the cal.·sec.−1cm.−1deg.−1 and the watt.·cm.−1deg.−1 (1 watt equals 1 joule/sec.).  
1 c a l . sec . 1 cm . 1 deg . 1 = 4.18 5 watt cm . 1 deg . 1 1 watt cm . 1 deg . 1 = 0.239 cal . sec . 1 cm . 1 deg . 1

A unit sometimes encountered in engineering work is the British thermal unit per square foot per hour for . . .

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