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  Contents   
    Page 
Table 14  1. Triple points  205 
  2. Equilibrium between two solid phases  206 
  3. Melting curves  207 
  Specific volume of liquid water:   
  4.1. From 0° to 350°C.; 1 to 1000 bars  208 
  4.2. From −20° to 100°C.; 1 to 12,000 bars  208 
  4.3. At 25°C.; 1 to 12,000 bars  209 
  4.4. From 25° to 85°C.; 1, 500, and 1000 bars  209 
  5. Liquid-vapor saturation curve; heat of vaporization  210 
  Specific volume of water vapor:   
  6.1. From 100° to 650°C.; 1 to 2000 bars  211 
  6.2. From 700° to 1200°C.; 50 to 4000 bars  211 
  7. Heat capacity of air-free water  212 
  Contents   
    Page 
Table 14  1. Triple points  205 
  2. Equilibrium between two solid phases  206 
  3. Melting curves  207 
  Specific volume of liquid water:   
  4.1. From 0° to 350°C.; 1 to 1000 bars  208 
  4.2. From −20° to 100°C.; 1 to 12,000 bars  208 
  4.3. At 25°C.; 1 to 12,000 bars  209 
  4.4. From 25° to 85°C.; 1, 500, and 1000 bars  209 
  5. Liquid-vapor saturation curve; heat of vaporization  210 
  Specific volume of water vapor:   
  6.1. From 100° to 650°C.; 1 to 2000 bars  211 
  6.2. From 700° to 1200°C.; 50 to 4000 bars  211 
  7. Heat capacity of air-free water  212 

The data for specific volume are presented in separate tables rather than in a single composite because they are not all of equal accuracy. In order to express the results as a single composite, it would be necessary to assign statistical probabilities to each set of data, a procedure which at present would be arbitrary and unwarranted. Furthermore, no single set of data can be treated as self-consistent—i.e., as of uniform accuracy, and the change in experimental error with variations of temperature and pressure may at times have taken place in an unrecognized manner. Correction factors worked out for small overlaps cannot, therefore, be safely extrapolated over large areas.

In this section temperature is expressed in degrees centigrade, pressure in bars, and volumes or changes in volume in cubic centimeters per gram. Although there seems to be no apparent uniformity of usage with respect to large . . .

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