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Composite-laccolith emplacement of the post-tectonic Vila Pouca de Aguiar granite pluton (northern Portugal): a combined AMS and gravity study

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H. Sant'Ovaia
H. Sant'Ovaia
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J. L. Bouchez
J. L. Bouchez
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F. Noronha
F. Noronha
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D. Leblanc
D. Leblanc
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J. L. Vigneresse
J. L. Vigneresse
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Published:
January 01, 2000

The Vila Pouca de Aguiar granite pluton, emplaced during the latest event of the Variscan orogeny of northern Portugal, is here subjected to a detailed study that combines magnetic fabric measurements and gravity modelling of its shape at depth. This laccolith, less than 1km in thickness over ≈60% of its outcrop area, appears to be fed from its northern area, through narrow conduits, up to 5 km deep, belonging to a set of Y-shaped valleys that almost perfectly correspond to the local Régua–Verin fault-system identified in the geological maps. A normal petrographical zonation, already identified geologically, appears to be rather progressive, although a gradient in magnetic suceptibility magnitude in-between the two main magma types is evidenced. It is suggested that the first to be emplaced and the least evolved granite type (Vila Pouca de Aguiar Granite) upwelled from the local, NE-trending fault-zone, acting as a dyke, and formed a thin sill where NE-directed magma flow was dominant, at least close to the floor. The more evolved granite type (Pedras Salgadas Granite), located just above the main feeder zone, and deeply rooted at the intersection beween underlying faults, is at the centre of a remarkably regular concentric distribution of the foliation trajectories. They may reflect the late doming of the laccolith's northern part, coeval with a slight E–W extension of the inflating magma reservoir, as marked by the E–W-trending lineations. Along with ubiquitous magmatic to near-magmatic microstructures and particularly low anisotropy magnitudes, such patterns can be entirely explained by magma movement within its inflating reservoir. This composite laccolith, during emplacement of which no interference with the regional strain pattern can be recorded, is therefore considered as typical of post-tectonic emplacement.

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GSA Special Papers

The Fourth Hutton Symposium on the Origin of Granites and Related Rocks

Bernard Barbarin
Bernard Barbarin
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William Edryd Stephens
William Edryd Stephens
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Bernard Bonin
Bernard Bonin
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Jean-Luc Bouchez
Jean-Luc Bouchez
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David Barrie Clarke
David Barrie Clarke
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Michel Cuney
Michel Cuney
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Hervé Martin
Hervé Martin
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Geological Society of America
Volume
350
ISBN print:
9780813723501
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

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