Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Thermal evolution of silicic magma chambers after basalt replenishments

By
Takehiro Koyaguchi
Takehiro Koyaguchi
Search for other works by this author on:
Katsuya Kaneko
Katsuya Kaneko
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2000

In order to understand the governing factors of petrological features of erupted magmas of island-arc or continental volcanoes, thermal fluctuations of subvolcanic silicic magma chambers caused by intermittent basalt replenishments are investigated from the theoretical viewpoint. When basaltic magmas are repeatedly emplaced into continental crust, a long-lived silicic magma chamber may form. A silicic magma chamber within surrounding crust is composed of crystal-melt mixtures with variable melt fractions. We define the region which behaves as a liquid in a mechanical sense (‘liquid part’) and the region which is in the critical state between liquid and solid states (‘mush’) collectively as a magma chamber in this study. Such a magma chamber is surrounded by partially molten solid with lower melt fractions. Erupted magmas are considered to be derived from the liquid part. The size of a silicic magma chamber is determined by the long-term balance between heat supply from basalt and heat loss by conduction, while the temperature and the volume of the liquid part fluctuate in response to individual basalt inputs. Thermal evolution of a silicic magma chamber after each basalt input is divided into two stages. In the first stage, the liquid part rapidly propagates within the magma chamber by melting the silicic mush, and its temperature rises above and decays back to the effective fusion temperature of the crystal-melt mixture on a short timescale. In some cases the liquid part no longer exists. In the second stage, the liquid part ceases to propagate and cools slowly by heat conduction on a much longer timescale. The petrological features of the liquid part, such as the amount of unmelted pre-existing crystals, depend on the intensity of individual pulses of the basalt heat source and the degree of fractionation during the first stage, as well as the bulk composition of the silicic magma.

You do not currently have access to this article.
Don't already have an account? Register

Figures & Tables

Contents

GSA Special Papers

The Fourth Hutton Symposium on the Origin of Granites and Related Rocks

Bernard Barbarin
Bernard Barbarin
Search for other works by this author on:
William Edryd Stephens
William Edryd Stephens
Search for other works by this author on:
Bernard Bonin
Bernard Bonin
Search for other works by this author on:
Jean-Luc Bouchez
Jean-Luc Bouchez
Search for other works by this author on:
David Barrie Clarke
David Barrie Clarke
Search for other works by this author on:
Michel Cuney
Michel Cuney
Search for other works by this author on:
Hervé Martin
Hervé Martin
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of America
Volume
350
ISBN print:
9780813723501
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

GeoRef

References

Related

A comprehensive resource of eBooks for researchers in the Earth Sciences

This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

View Article Abstract & Purchase Options

For full access to this pdf, sign in to an existing account, or purchase an annual subscription.

Subscribe Now