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Book Chapter

Search for the Tunguska event relics in the Antarctic snow and new estimation of the cosmic iridium accretion rate

By
Robert Rocchia
Robert Rocchia
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Philippe Bonté
Philippe Bonté
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Célestine Jéhanno
Célestine Jéhanno
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Eric Robin
Eric Robin
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Martine de Angelis
Martine de Angelis
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Daniel Boclet
Daniel Boclet
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Published:
January 01, 1990

A careful search for iridium in snow-ice samples deposited in Antarctica by the time of the great Tunguska explosion in 1908 has produced negative results. The worldwide dispersion of the cosmic bolide responsible for the event has not left a detectable Ir inprint in South Pole snow. The iridium infall from the Tunguska event is at least a factor of 20 lower than previously estimated. The local iridium background, averaged over a period of 30 years, is consistent with a global micrometeorite flux of about 10 Gg per year.

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Contents

GSA Special Papers

Global Catastrophes in Earth History; An Interdisciplinary Conference on Impacts, Volcanism, and Mass Mortality

Virgil L. Sharpton
Virgil L. Sharpton
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Peter D. Ward
Peter D. Ward
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Geological Society of America
Volume
247
ISBN print:
9780813722474
Publication date:
January 01, 1990

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