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Fault rocks can be studied by charting how undeformed rocks near a fault transform into mylonitic or cataclastic tectonites, or by examining rock masses at different points along a fault to determine how changes in temperature, pressure, etc. affected the fault’s history. Both approaches have merit in thrust belts because thrust faults form under a range of conditions and may evolve along several different paths. Using the first approach, we distinguish two fault zone types analogous to Means’ (1984) two types of shear zones: Type I fault zones grow in thickness as movement on the fault increases; Type II fault...

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