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Land use and desert dust hazards in central Arizona

By
ALBERT D. HYERS
ALBERT D. HYERS
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MELVING. MARCUS
MELVING. MARCUS
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Published:
January 01, 1981

Land use and surface sediments reveal a strong locational association between sparsely vegetated, abandoned farmland and dust-related accidents on Interstate Route 10 in central Arizona. Three classes of land use prevail in the area: natural desert, irrigated farmland, and abandoned farmland. Sediments sampled from all land-use types are predominantly silt to clay-size particles that are amenable to deflation and eolian transport processes. Abandoned farmland is particularly effective as a dust source because of its lack of vegetational anchor and its accessibility to human activities that disrupt the soil crust and make soil available to the wind. Off-road vehicles and livestock are major factors in this regard. Possible means to reduce dust hazards over Interstate 10 include use of wind disrupting barriers, surface treatment, and land-use restrictions.

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Contents

GSA Special Papers

Desert Dust: Origin, Characteristics, and Effect on Man

Troy L. Péwé
Troy L. Péwé
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Geological Society of America
Volume
186
ISBN print:
9780813721866
Publication date:
January 01, 1981

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