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Book Chapter

Distribution of Trace Elements in the Environment and the Occurrence of Heart Disease in Georgia

By
Hansford T. Shacklette
Hansford T. Shacklette
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Herbert I. Sauer
Herbert I. Sauer
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Alfred T. Miesch
Alfred T. Miesch
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Published:
January 01, 1972

The concentrations of certain chemical elements in native plants, garden vegetables, and soils were studied in two areas of Georgia, each made up of nine counties, that have greatly different heart disease mortality rates. The soils of the two areas were found to be geochemically distinct. The greater amounts of trace elements in soils occur in the counties that have the lower death rates, but the abundances of trace elements in trees and vegetables do not correspond closely to the abundances in the soils. The trace elements in soils, however, may have entered the human food chain in water, in other food plants, and in meat and milk that were not sampled in this study. If geochemical differences between the soils of the high-death-rate area and the low-death-rate area do, in fact, have a causal relationship to death from cardiovascular diseases, the cause would appear to be a deficiency, rather than an excess, of the elements that were studied.

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Contents

GSA Special Papers

Geochemical Environment in Relation to Health and Disease

Helen L. Cannon
Helen L. Cannon
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Howard C. Hopps
Howard C. Hopps
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Geological Society of America
Volume
140
ISBN print:
9780813721408
Publication date:
January 01, 1972

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