Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Conditions of Deposition of Pennsylvanian Coal Beds

By
Harold R. Wanless
Harold R. Wanless
Search for other works by this author on:
James R. Baroffio
James R. Baroffio
Search for other works by this author on:
Peter C. Trescott
Peter C. Trescott
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 1969

Studies of distribution and character of Pennsylvanian coals in the eastern and central United States have shown that their accumulation resulted from several environmental patterns, as follows: (1) distribution controlled by the building of a widespread delta (Illinois 5, 5a, and 6 coals in southern Illinois basin); (2) unfilled channels, either of alluvial streams (western Illinois No. 4 coal) or unfilled delta distributary channels (No. 5 coal, southeastern Illinois) – thinner coal is found away from the unfilled channels; (3) coal accumulation in an estuary prior to drowning (No. 1 coal of Illinois); (4) deposition on a narrow coastal strip comparable with Atlantic coastal marshes of today (Mulberry coal of Missouri and Kansas); (5) local accumulation in a lagoon behind an offshore barrier (Ogan, Winters, Clarion, and Scrubgrass coals of southern Ohio); (6) local accumulation in a cut-off meander of a stream, with clastic partings and no underclay (local coals in Pleasantview Sandstone of western Illinois); (7) a plain exposed following abrupt marine regression (Lexington coal of Missouri and Iowa); (8) a level depositional plain formed by burial of pre-Pennsylvanian topographic irregularities (No. 2 coal of Illinois; Croweburg coal of midcontinent).

Some coals formed on delta plains or flood plains are separated from channels by natural levees, and an example has been found in the substrata of the No. 5 coal in southeastern Illinois. Where a fluviatile or deltaic channel was filled, because of greater compaction of shales a way from the channel, a coal may thin or wedge out over the channel sandstone.

A study of the environments in which Pennsylvanian coals have formed contributes also to the understanding of the genesis of underclays. It is suggested that an understanding of composition and geometry of coal substrata should guide exploration for future coal reserves.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

GSA Special Papers

Environments of Coal Deposition: Papers Presented at a Symposium by the Coal Geology Division of The Geological Society of America at the Annual Meeting Miami Beach, Florida, 1964

Edward C. Dapples
Edward C. Dapples
Editors
Search for other works by this author on:
M. E. Hopkins
M. E. Hopkins
Editors
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of America
Volume
114
ISBN print:
9780813721149
Publication date:
January 01, 1969

References

Related

Citing Books via

A comprehensive resource of eBooks for researchers in the Earth Sciences

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal