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Many ore-producing hydrothermal systems form within intrinsically low permeability host rocks during fracture-controlled flow in overpressured fluid regimes. The generation and localization of fracture-controlled fluid pathways in these systems involves dynamic coupling between fluid flow, fluid pressures, stress states, and deformation processes. In high fluid flux settings, fracture-controlled permeability enhancement is driven largely by fluid pressurization rather than by tectonic loading. The orientation of the stress field plays a critical role in governing the orientations of activated fractures. Permeability destruction by fracture sealing and cementation of fragmented rock is rapid relative to the lifetimes of hydrothermal systems. Accordingly, repeated...

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