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Tidally influenced shoal water delta and estuary in the Middle Jurassic of the Søgne Basin, Norwegian North Sea: sedimentary response to rift initiation and salt tectonics

By
Donatella Mellere
Donatella Mellere
Premier-Oil Exploration plc, 23 Lower Belgrave Street, London, UK
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Aruna Mannie
Aruna Mannie
Premier-Oil Exploration plc, 23 Lower Belgrave Street, London, UK
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Sergio Longhitano
Sergio Longhitano
Universita’ della Basilicata, Department of Sciences, Potenza, Italy
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Mike Mazur
Mike Mazur
Premier-Oil Exploration plc, 23 Lower Belgrave Street, London, UK
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HYELNI KULAUSA
HYELNI KULAUSA
Premier-Oil Exploration plc, 23 Lower Belgrave Street, London, UK
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Samme Brough
Samme Brough
Premier-Oil Exploration plc, 23 Lower Belgrave Street, London, UK
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James Cotton
James Cotton
Premier-Oil Exploration plc, 23 Lower Belgrave Street, London, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract:

Recent studies in the Middle Jurassic Bryne and Sandnes formations, primary reservoirs in several fields across the Norwegian and Danish North Sea, show the widespread occurrence of tidal-influenced and tide-dominated deposits. Aalenian–Bajocian Bryne cores reflect deposition by a shoal water, tidally influenced delta onto a low wave energy tidal platform (both supratidal and intertidal) that probably occupied the majority of the Søgne Basin, a narrow rift system connected to the Central and Danish graben and transgressed from an open-marine basin, possibly located to the south. At the Bathonian–Callovian boundary, a new phase of rifting and progressive salt movements led to the deposition of the upper Bryne and Sandnes formations within an 80–100 km long composite estuarine valley. Basin tilting to the south and continued transgression resulted in tidal deltas that offlap the northern margin of the basin. The basin was fully transgressed by the end of the Callovian. From the Late Bathonian onwards, differential tectonic movements along the broadly interconnected Middle Jurassic rift basins led to a change in the transgression direction from south to north, with an open-marine basin located in the Central and Viking graben.

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Sedimentology of Paralic Reservoirs: Recent Advances

G. J. Hampson
G. J. Hampson
Imperial College London, UK
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A. D. Reynolds
A. D. Reynolds
BP Exploration Operating Co. Ltd, UK
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B. Kostic
B. Kostic
Badley Ashton & Associates, UK
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M. R. Wells
M. R. Wells
BP Exploration Operating Co. Ltd, UK
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The Geological Society of London
Volume
444
ISBN electronic:
9781786203748
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

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