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Paleogeographic and paleotectonic setting of the Middle Miocene Mint Canyon and Caliente Formations, southern California: An integrated provenance study

By
Johanna F. Hoyt
Johanna F. Hoyt
Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567, USA
Aera Energy LLC, 10000 Ming Avenue, Bakersfield, California 93311, USA
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Kevin T. Coffey
Kevin T. Coffey
Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567, USA
Department of Earth Science, El Camino College, Torrance, California 90506, USA
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Raymond V. Ingersoll
Raymond V. Ingersoll
Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567, USA
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Carl E. Jacobson
Carl E. Jacobson
Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, 253 Science I, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-3212, USA
Department of Earth and Space Sciences, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383, USA
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Publication history
05 February 201805 October 2018

ABSTRACT

Conglomerate-clast analysis, sandstone petrology, and detrital zircon age data determine the provenance and correlation of the Middle Miocene Mint Canyon and Caliente Formations. Detrital zircon age assemblages and sandstone compositions confirm that the Mint Canyon Formation is the upstream equivalent of the southern Caliente Formation and that both are dissimilar to the Punchbowl Formation. The Mint Canyon and Caliente Formations are remnants of an axial drainage system that was likely confined by the ancestral Sierra Pelona/Blue Ridge to the north and ancestral San Gabriel Mountains to the south; sediments derived from these local highlands dominate in the Mint Canyon Formation. This study highlights the importance of integrated-methods analysis. Sandstone detrital modes capture the variability in sandstone composition and the degree of overlap between formations; conglomerate-clast compositional data show differences within the drainage system; distinct detrital zircon age assemblages implicate particular source terranes. Analysis of all these data sets provides a robust and complete characterization of the provenance of this confined drainage system.

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Contents

GSA Special Papers

Tectonics, Sedimentary Basins, and Provenance: A Celebration of the Career of William R. Dickinson

Geological Society of America
Volume
540
ISBN electronic:
9780813795409

GeoRef

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