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Diagenetic controls on the location of reservoir sweet spots relative to palaeotopographical and structural highs

By
Jessica E. Poteet
Jessica E. Poteet
Department of Geology, Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium (KICC), University of Kansas, 1475 Jayhawk Boulevard, Lawrence, KS 66045, USAKansas Geological Survey, 1930 Constant Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66047, USA
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Robert H. Goldstein
Robert H. Goldstein
Department of Geology, Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium (KICC), University of Kansas, 1475 Jayhawk Boulevard, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA
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Evan K. Franseen
Evan K. Franseen
Department of Geology, Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium (KICC), University of Kansas, 1475 Jayhawk Boulevard, Lawrence, KS 66045, USAKansas Geological Survey, 1930 Constant Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66047, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2018

Abstract:

Many carbonate reservoirs are located on top, or down the flanks, of extant structural highs or syndepositional palaeo-highs. This study examines diagenesis in Pennsylvanian oolitic reservoirs close to the crest and down the flank of a long-lived anticline. It illustrates that the position of the best reservoir quality shifted back and forth during successive diagenetic events. Cement stratigraphy shows that early diagenesis did not enhance reservoir character significantly. Most oomoldic porosity formed penecontemporaneously with compaction. Fluid-inclusion and stable isotope data indicate that late cements precipitated during burial conditions by refluxing brines and later hydrothermal fluids. After initial burial, greater permeability existed downdip, where smaller amounts of early meteoric cement allowed for compaction. Subsequent reflux cementation initially degraded downdip reservoirs preferentially and then progressed updip, resulting in relatively uniform reservoir porosity. Later hydrothermal events are most important in affecting the distribution of the highest quality present-day reservoir. Highest porosity is preserved in wells down the flanks of the structure, where hydrothermal cements are not as prevalent. Understanding the effect of diagenesis on location of the best reservoir in relation to palaeotopographical and structural highs allows for the prediction of reservoir quality using seismic and mapping data typically available in the subsurface.

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Reservoir Quality of Clastic and Carbonate Rocks: Analysis, Modelling and Prediction

P. J. Armitage
P. J. Armitage
BP Upstream Technology, UK
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A. R. Butcher
A. R. Butcher
Geological Survey of Finland, Finland
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J.M. Churchill
J.M. Churchill
Shell UK Ltd, UK
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A.E. Csoma
A.E. Csoma
MOL Group Exploration, Hungary
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C. Hollis
C. Hollis
University of Manchester, UK
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R. H. Lander
R. H. Lander
Geocosm, USA
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J. E. Omma
J. E. Omma
Rocktype, UK
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R. H. Worden
R. H. Worden
University of Liverpool, UK
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The Geological Society of London
Volume
435
ISBN electronic:
9781786202901
Publication date:
January 01, 2018

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