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Chapter 28: Seismic Techniques to Detect Dissolution Features (Karst) at a Proposed Power-Plant Site

By
Richard D. Miller
Richard D. Miller
Kansas Geological Survey, 1930 Constant Avenue, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66047-3726, E-mail: rmiller@kgs.ku.edu.
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Jianghai Xia
Jianghai Xia
Kansas Geological Survey, 1930 Constant Avenue, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66047-3726, E-mail: rmiller@kgs.ku.edu.
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Choon B. Park
Choon B. Park
Kansas Geological Survey, 1930 Constant Avenue, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66047-3726, E-mail: rmiller@kgs.ku.edu.
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Published:
January 01, 2005

Introduction

Population growth in southern Alabama and in the panhandle of northwestern Florida has taxed the current electric grid to the point that many critical services could be in jeopardy during peak demand times. Surplus or overflow electric power generation facilities are critical to small power cooperatives that must buy power when peak demand exceeds their maximum production capacities. Locating sites for power generation facilities has historically relied on the convergence of three things: fuel delivery system (pipeline, railroad, harbor, etc.), water (river, lake, etc.), and power grid (high-tension regional distribution electric lines), with concerns for the site geology being secondary or not considered at all.

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Contents

Investigations in Geophysics

Near-Surface Geophysics

Dwain K. Butler
Dwain K. Butler
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Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
13
ISBN electronic:
9781560801719
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

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