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Chapter 20: A Comparison of Three Geophysical Methods for Characterizing Air Flow from an Air Sparging Well

By
David L. Alumbaugh
David L. Alumbaugh
1
Geological Engineering Program, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin, 53706
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Douglas P. Simon
Douglas P. Simon
1
Geological Engineering Program, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin, 53706
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Craig H. Benson
Craig H. Benson
1
Geological Engineering Program, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin, 53706
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Published:
January 01, 2005

Introduction

In-situ air sparging (IAS) is a remediation technique that uses air to remove volatile and degradable contaminants from soil and groundwater. Air is injected below the water table, and then travels upward toward the surface due to buoyant pressures. Volatile contaminants are removed as they partition into the flowing air. Air also dissolves into the groundwater, which increases the oxygen content thereby stimulating aerobic biodegradation. The injected air generally forms a plume that passes through the soil in a series of channels.

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Contents

Investigations in Geophysics

Near-Surface Geophysics

Dwain K. Butler
Dwain K. Butler
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Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
13
ISBN electronic:
9781560801719
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

GeoRef

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