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Book Chapter

Part 2: Applications and Case Histories

Published:
January 01, 2005

Introduction

Carbonate formations generally have broad pore size distributions, from microcrystalline pores to large vugs. Understanding these pore spaces and their geometries is crucial to hydrocarbon reservoir characterization, and because carbonates form aquifers in many regions, an understanding of their pore systems is critical to an understanding of hydrological processes, as well.

Introduction

Seismic velocities and attenuations collected in the field with, for example, reflection, refraction, and crosshole surveys serve as valuable constraints on subsurface lithology, porosity, permeability, and fluid saturation. Until recently, the measurement resolution of seismic velocities in the shallow subsurface had limited the use of the complete power of seismic attribute analysis in shallow soils. Recent advances in field techniques for seismic measurements in shallow soils (e.g., Bachrach et al., 1998; Bachrach and Mukerji, this volume; Baker et al., 1999; Carr et al., 1998; Steeples et al., 1999) as well as the development of seismic cone penetration tests (SCPT) and other improved geotechnical methods (e.g., Crouse et al., 1993; Boulanger et al., 1998) have begun to permit the application of seismic attribute analysis to shallow soils. Unfortunately, the laboratory studies required for establishing relations between the physical properties of the soils and their seismic properties have not been extended to the low pressures analogous to these shallow depths, so the effects of lithology, fluid saturation, and compaction on seismic (P- and S-wave) properties of shallow soils are largely unknown.

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Contents

Investigations in Geophysics

Near-Surface Geophysics

Dwain K. Butler
Dwain K. Butler
Search for other works by this author on:
Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
13
ISBN electronic:
9781560801719
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

GeoRef

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