Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Chapter 5: Inversion for Applied Geophysics: A Tutorial

By
Douglas W. Oldenburg
Douglas W. Oldenburg
1
UBC-Geophysical Inversion Facility, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada V6T 1Z4
Search for other works by this author on:
Yaoguo Li
Yaoguo Li
2
Department of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, 80401
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2005

Introduction

Throughout this book there are numerous cases where geophysics has been used to help solve practical environmental, geotechnical, and exploration problems. The typical scenario is first to identify the physical property that is diagnostic of the sought geologic structure or buried object, for example, density, seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, or magnetic susceptibility. The appropriate geophysical survey is then designed and field data are acquired and plotted. In some cases the information needed to solve the problem may be obtained directly from these plots, but in most cases more information about the subsurface is required. As an example, consider the magnetic field anomaly map presented in Figure 2. The existence of a buried object, and also approximate horizontal locations, can be inferred directly from that image. The map, however, presents no information about the depth of the object or details regarding its shape. To obtain that information the data need to be inverted to generate a 3D subsurface distribution of the magnetic material.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Investigations in Geophysics

Near-Surface Geophysics

Dwain K. Butler
Dwain K. Butler
Search for other works by this author on:
Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
13
ISBN electronic:
9781560801719
Publication date:
January 01, 2005

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal