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Book Chapter

Chapter 20: Collaborative Methods in Enhanced Cold Heavy-oil Production

By
Larry Lines
Larry Lines
1
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Hossein Agharbarati
Hossein Agharbarati
1
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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P. F. Daley
P. F. Daley
1
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Joan Embleton
Joan Embleton
1
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Mathew Fay
Mathew Fay
1
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Tony Settari
Tony Settari
1
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Fereidoon Vasheghani
Fereidoon Vasheghani
1
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Tingge Wang
Tingge Wang
1
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Albert Zhang
Albert Zhang
1
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Xun Qi
Xun Qi
2
University of Alberta, Institute for Geophysical Research, Department of Physics, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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Douglas Schmitt
Douglas Schmitt
2
University of Alberta, Institute for Geophysical Research, Department of Physics, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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Published:
January 01, 2010

Introduction

Heavy-oil reservoirs are an abundant hydrocarbon resource, which will in all probability comprise a significant portion of long-term world oil production. The world’s heavy-oil reserves have been estimated to be approximately 6 trillion barrels — roughly equivalent to conventional reserves. The largest heavy-oil reserves are in Canada, Venezuela, the United States, Norway, Indonesia, China, Russia, and Kuwait.

Cold production is a low-energy production method that has been widely used in Western Canada. Although the primary recovery rates are relatively modest, cold production of heavy oil requires much less energy than hot production methods such as cyclic steam injection (CSS) or steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), and as a consequence it results in much less hydrocarbon use in the recovery stage.

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Contents

Geophysical Developments Series

Heavy Oils: Reservoir Characterization and Production Monitoring

Satinder Chopra
Satinder Chopra
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Laurence R. Lines
Laurence R. Lines
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Douglas R. Schmitt
Douglas R. Schmitt
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Michael L. Batzle
Michael L. Batzle
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Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
13
ISBN electronic:
9781560802235
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

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