Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Chapter 11: Airborne Hyperspectral Detection of Natural Offshore and Onshore Hydrocarbon Seeps

By
Alfredo Prelat
Alfredo Prelat
1
NEOS GeoSolutions, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. E-mail: aprelat@neosgeo.com.
Search for other works by this author on:
Sepalika Gunaratne
Sepalika Gunaratne
1
NEOS GeoSolutions, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. E-mail: aprelat@neosgeo.com.
Search for other works by this author on:
Laura Huebner
Laura Huebner
1
NEOS GeoSolutions, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. E-mail: aprelat@neosgeo.com.
Search for other works by this author on:
Clint Freeman
Clint Freeman
1
NEOS GeoSolutions, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. E-mail: aprelat@neosgeo.com.
Search for other works by this author on:
Allan Cook
Allan Cook
1
NEOS GeoSolutions, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. E-mail: aprelat@neosgeo.com.
Search for other works by this author on:
Christopher Soriano
Christopher Soriano
1
NEOS GeoSolutions, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. E-mail: aprelat@neosgeo.com.
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2013

Abstract

Hydrocarbon seeps occur naturally in many places, including onshore, offshore, and along the coast of Santa Barbara and Ventura counties in southern California. Existing seep-mapping projects include Santa Barbara County’s Natural Seep Inventory and the University of California Santa Barbara’s Bubbleology Coal Oil Point interactive explorer. Organic compounds typically associated with reservoir hydrocarbons are often recognized at or near the surface. Direct and indirect detection of these compounds and their associated (alteration) phenomena are a primary means of establishing the presence of an active or previously active petroleum system. Surface hydrocarbons can be detected by hyperspectral remote-sensing techniques. Hyperspectral data were collected over the Santa Barbara area onshore and offshore by gravity and magnetic surveys. The hyperspectral sensors collected data spanning the visible, near-infrared, shortwave-infrared, and thermal-infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Images were viewed using false-color infrared composite with different enhancement levels for preliminary hydrocarbon identification at various locations in the imagery. Spectral signatures from the airborne hyperspectral data, combined with field spectroradiometer measurements of known seeps, were used to create a spectral library. Numerical classification techniques identified known and previously unknown occurrences of hydrocarbons. Magnetic and gravity surveys were acquired simultaneously and were used to map major geologic trends and structures in relation to the presence of seeps. The occurrence and distribution of detected seeps provided direct evidence of the presence of an active petroleum system.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geophysical Developments Series

Hydrocarbon Seepage: From Source to Surface

Fred Aminzadeh
Fred Aminzadeh
Search for other works by this author on:
Timothy B. Berge
Timothy B. Berge
Search for other works by this author on:
David L. Connolly
David L. Connolly
Search for other works by this author on:
Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
16
ISBN electronic:
9781560803119
Publication date:
January 01, 2013

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal