Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Chapter 8: Design and construction considerations

By
M. G. Winter
M. G. Winter
Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), 10B Swanston Steading, 109 Swanston Road, Edinburgh EH10 7DS, UKUniversity of Portsmouth, School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3QL, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
V. Troughton
V. Troughton
Arup, 13 Fitzroy Street, London W1T 4BQ, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
R. Bayliss
R. Bayliss
Parsons Brinckerhoff, Amber Court, William Armstrong Drive, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 7YQ, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
C. Golightly
C. Golightly
Independent Consultant, Rue Marc Brison 10G, 1300 Limal, Belgium
Search for other works by this author on:
L. Spasic-Gril
L. Spasic-Gril
Arup, 13 Fitzroy Street, London W1T 4BQ, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
P. R. N. Hobbs
P. R. N. Hobbs
British Geological Survey (BGS), Environmental Science Centre, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
K. D. Privett
K. D. Privett
Hydrock, Over Court Barns, Over Lane, Almondsbury, Bristol BS32 4DF, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract

Relict glacial and periglacial environments are widespread, and the deposits that they are associated with mean it is inevitable that the design and construction of many projects will be influenced by their presence and nature. Tills and other glaciogenic deposits prove to be particularly challenging in this context for reasons that include: the spatial variability of the nature of the deposits; the wide range of particle sizes often included within a given soil, including large-sized particles; spatial variation in soil type and properties; variation in depth to rockhead and variable degrees of weathering and alteration; the presence of groundwater, that is misinterpreted as perched water, as well as sub-artesian and artesian conditions; the presence of solution features and fissures, partly or completely infilled with soft or loose material; and the presence of (often shallow) shear surfaces at residual strength. In this chapter, some of the more common problems and associated solutions associated with earthworks and man-made slopes, tunnels and underground structures, dams and reservoirs, foundations, and offshore engineering and installations are reviewed. It is important that great care is taken in addressing the influences of variability, complexity and uncertainty inherent in glacial/periglacial soil formations at all stages of the construction process, from feasibility to end-of-project activities, such as preparation of the as-built drawings.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

Geological Society, London, Engineering Geology Special Publications

Engineering Geology and Geomorphology of Glaciated and Periglaciated Terrains: Engineering Group Working Party Report

J. S. Griffiths
J. S. Griffiths
University of Plymouth, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
C. J. Martin
C. J. Martin
BP Exploration Operating Company Ltd, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
The Geological Society of London
Volume
28
ISBN electronic:
9781786203038
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal