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Book Chapter

Microfossils in Iron Age and Romano-British ceramics from eastern England

By
I. P. Wilkinson
I. P. Wilkinson
British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UKDepartment of Geology, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
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M. Williams
M. Williams
Department of Geology, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
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C. Stocker
C. Stocker
Department of Geology, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
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I. Whitbread
I. Whitbread
School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
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I. Boomer
I. Boomer
School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
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T. Farman
T. Farman
Department of Geology, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
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J. Taylor
J. Taylor
School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract

Clay was an important resource for the Iron Age and Romano-British population of eastern England as a building material as well as in the manufacture of ceramics. The micropa-laeontological and petrological signatures of potsherds from the hill fort at Burrough Hill (Leicestershire), Gamston (Nottinghamshire) and four sites in Cambridgeshire (Barley Croft Farm, Trumpington Meadows, Bradley Fen and Kings Dyke, Whittlesey) reflect the age and geological provenance of the raw materials and the firing methods. The clay used in the ceramics from Burrough Hill appears to have been sourced from the local Pleistocene glacial till (Anglian-age Oadby Member, Wolston Formation), whereas those from Gamston were probably derived from the nearby Lower Jurassic strata. Although microfossils were very rare in the material from Cambridgeshire, those found are not inconsistent with an Upper Jurassic source.

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Contents

The Micropalaeontological Society, Special Publications

The Archaeological and Forensic Applications of Microfossils: A Deeper Understanding of Human History

M. Williams
M. Williams
University of Leicester, UK
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T. Hill
T. Hill
The Natural History Museum, UK
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I. Boomer
I. Boomer
University of Birmingham, UK
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I. P. Wilkinson
I. P. Wilkinson
British Geological Survey, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
7
ISBN electronic:
9781786203069
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

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