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Book Chapter

The contribution of micropalaeontology to the study of Bronze Age potters’ workshops at Tel Lachish, Israel and the biostratigraphy of the Lachish area

By
Tom Dunkley Jones
Tom Dunkley Jones
School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
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Pamela Magrill
Pamela Magrill
Independent Researcher, 19 Leighton Road, Birmingham, UK
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Menahem Weinbaum Hefetz
Menahem Weinbaum Hefetz
Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Mailbox 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel
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Laura Cotton
Laura Cotton
Naturalis Biodiversity Centre, Darwinweg 2, 2333 CR, Leiden, The NetherlandsPresent Address: Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, 241 Williamson Hall, PO Box 2120, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120, USAFlorida Museum of Natural History, 1659 Museum Road, PO Box 117800, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
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Paul N. Pearson
Paul N. Pearson
School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AT, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract

The remains of potters’ workshops, dating to the Early Bronze and Late Bronze ages, came to light during the 1930s British excavations at Tel Lachish, Israel. In the course of a recent petrographic study, well-preserved microfossils were identified in thin-sections of unfired sherds and prepared clay from these workshops. Subsequent specialist micropalaeontological analyses for both calcareous foraminifera and nannofossils were carried out in order to address a number of archaeological questions. When combined with the micropalaeontological analysis of new out-crop samples in the vicinity of the site, it is clear that clays derived from the late Eocene to early Oligocene marls and chalks, exposed at the base of the tell, were extensively used by both the Early and Late Bronze Age potters. In addition, the study has brought to light new information about their activities, particularly with regard to their choice and use of raw materials over time. We also provide new nannofossil-based age constraints on the upper Bet Guvrin Formation and the lower part of the Lachish Formation in the Lachish area.

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Contents

The Micropalaeontological Society, Special Publications

The Archaeological and Forensic Applications of Microfossils: A Deeper Understanding of Human History

M. Williams
M. Williams
University of Leicester, UK
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T. Hill
T. Hill
The Natural History Museum, UK
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I. Boomer
I. Boomer
University of Birmingham, UK
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I. P. Wilkinson
I. P. Wilkinson
British Geological Survey, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
7
ISBN electronic:
9781786203069
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

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