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Deformational history and thermochronology of Wrangel Island, East Siberian Shelf and coastal Chukotka, Arctic Russia

By
Elizabeth L. Miller
Elizabeth L. Miller
Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
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V. V. Akinin
V. V. Akinin
North-East Interdisciplinary Scientific Research Institute, Magadan, Russia
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T. A. Dumitru
T. A. Dumitru
Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
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E. S. Gottlieb
E. S. Gottlieb
Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
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M. Grove
M. Grove
Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
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K. Meisling
K. Meisling
Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
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G. Seward
G. Seward
Department of Geological Sciences, U.C. Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2018

Abstract

In Arctic Russia, south of Wrangel Island, Jura–Cretaceous fold belt structures are cut by c. 108–100 Ma plutonic rocks and a c. 103 Ma migmatitic complex (U–Pb, zircon) that cooled by c. 96 Ma (40Ar/39Ar biotite); the structures are unconformably overlain by c. 88 Ma and younger (U–Pb, zircon) volcanic rocks. Wrangel Island, with a similar stratigraphy and added exposure of Neoproterozoic basement rocks, was thought to represent the westwards continuation of the Jura–Cretaceous Brookian thrust belt of Alaska. A penetrative, high-strain, S-dipping foliation formed during north–south stretching in Triassic and older rocks, with stretched pebble aspect ratios of c. 2:1:0.5 to 10:1:0.1. Deformation was at greenschist facies (chlorite+white mica; biotite at depth; temperature c. 300–450°C). Microstructures suggest deformation mostly by pure shear and north–south stretching; the quartz textures and lattice preferred orientations suggest temperatures of c. 300–450°C. 40Ar/39Ar K-feldspar spectra (n = 1) and muscovite (n = 3) (total gas ages c. 611–514 Ma) in Neoproterozoic basement rocks are consistent with a short thermal pulse during deformation at 105–100 Ma. Apatite fission track ages (n = 7) indicate cooling to near-surface conditions at c. 95 Ma. The shared thermal histories of Wrangel Island and Chukotka suggest that Wrangel deformation is related to post-shortening, north–south extension, not to fold–thrust belt deformation. Seismic data (line AR-5) indicate a sharp Moho and strong sub-horizontal reflectivity in the lower and middle crust beneath the region. Wrangel Island probably represents a crustal-scale extensional boudin between the North Chukchi and Longa basins.

Supplementary material: Sample localities, details of the analytical methods, data tables and the full discussion of the results of electron back-scatter diffraction studies of quartz lattice preferred orientations are available at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.3741272

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Circum-Arctic Lithosphere Evolution

V. Pease
V. Pease
Stockholm University, Sweden
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B. Coakley
B. Coakley
University of Alaska, Fairbanks, USA
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The Geological Society of London
Volume
460
ISBN electronic:
9781786203410
Publication date:
January 01, 2018

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