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Book Chapter

A review of deformation bands in reservoir sandstones: geometries, mechanisms and distribution

By
Haakon Fossen
Haakon Fossen
Department of Earth Science and Museum of Natural History, University of Bergen, Postboks 7803, 5007 Bergen, NorwayDepartamento de Geologia, Universidade Federal do Paraná – Setor de Ciências da Terra, Caixa Postal 19.001, Centro Politécnico - Jardim das Américas, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR, BrazilInstituto de Geociências, Universidade de São Paulo, 05508-900, SP, Brazil
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Roger Soliva
Roger Soliva
Geosciences Montpellier, Université de Montpellier, Campus Triolet, CC060, Place Eugène, Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05, France
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Gregory Ballas
Gregory Ballas
Institut Français de Recherche pour l’Exploitation de la Mer, Pointe du Diable, 29280 Plouzané, France
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Barbara Trzaskos
Barbara Trzaskos
Departamento de Geologia, Universidade Federal do Paraná – Setor de Ciências da Terra, Caixa Postal 19.001, Centro Politécnico - Jardim das Américas, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR, Brazil
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Carolina Cavalcante
Carolina Cavalcante
Departamento de Geologia, Universidade Federal do Paraná – Setor de Ciências da Terra, Caixa Postal 19.001, Centro Politécnico - Jardim das Américas, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR, Brazil
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Richard A. Schultz
Richard A. Schultz
Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin Texas 78712 USA
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Published:
January 01, 2018

Abstract

Deformation bands are common subseismic structures in porous sandstones that vary with respect to deformation mechanisms, geometries and distribution. The amount of cataclasis involved largely determines how they impact fluid flow, and cataclasis is generally promoted by coarse grain size, good sorting, high porosity and overburden (usually >500–1000 m). Most bands involve a combination of shear and compaction, and a distinction can be made between those where shear displacement greatly exceeds compaction (compactional shear bands or CSB), where the two are of similar magnitude (shear-enhanced compaction bands or SECB), and pure compaction bands (PCB). The latter two only occur in the contractional regime, are characterized by high (70–100°) dihedral angles (SECB) or perpendicularity (PCB) to σ1 (the maximum principal stress) and are restricted to layers with very high porosity. Contraction generally tends to produce populations of well-distributed deformation bands, whereas in the extensional regime the majority of bands are clustered around faults. Deformation bands also favour highly porous parts of a reservoir, which may result in a homogenization of the overall reservoir permeability and enhance sweep during hydrocarbon production. A number of intrinsic and external variables must therefore be considered when assessing the influence of deformation bands on reservoir performance.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Subseismic-Scale Reservoir Deformation

M. Ashton
M. Ashton
Badley Ashton America Inc., USA
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S. J. Dee
S. J. Dee
BP Exploration and Operating Company Limited, UK
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O. P. Wennberg
O. P. Wennberg
Statoil, Norway
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The Geological Society of London
Volume
459
ISBN electronic:
9781786203403
Publication date:
January 01, 2018

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