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Book Chapter

Regional distribution and controls on the development of post-rift turbidite systems: insights from the Paleocene of the eastern North Viking Graben, offshore Norway

By
Evelina Dmitrieva
Evelina Dmitrieva
Department of Earth Science & Engineering, Basins Research Group (BRG), Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, UKPresent address: Repsol, Mendez Alvaro 44, Madrid 28012, Spain
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Christopher A.-L. Jackson
Christopher A.-L. Jackson
Department of Earth Science & Engineering, Basins Research Group (BRG), Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP, UK
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Mads Huuse
Mads Huuse
School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Williamson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
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Ian A. Kane
Ian A. Kane
School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Williamson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
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Published:
January 01, 2018

Abstract

Paleocene deep-water deposits of the Norwegian sector of the North Sea Basin are prospective for oil and gas, although little is known about their sedimentology and distribution, or the controls on their stratigraphic evolution. To help unlock the potential of this poorly explored interval, we integrate 3D seismic reflection, well logs and core data from the eastern North Viking Graben, offshore Norway. We show that thick (up to 80 m), high net to gross (N:G) (up to 90%), sandstone-rich channel-fills and sheet-like, likely lobe deposits occur on the slope–proximal basin floor, forming part of an aerially extensive fan system. Sediment dispersal and the resultant stratigraphic architecture are controlled by slope morphology. Bypass occurred on the northern, passive margin-type slope; whereas, in the south, sediment gravity currents were deflected around, and deep-water sandstones onlap and pinch-out onto an exposed rift-related fault block that generated intra-basin bathymetric relief. Pinchout of deep-water sandstone into mudstone suggests that future exploration should focus on identifying subtle stratigraphic traps on fault block flanks or at the fan fringe. This trapping style contrasts with that encountered in the UK sector of the Northern North Sea, where most Paleocene fields and discoveries are in structural traps related to the flow of Zechstein Supergroup salt.

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Petroleum Geology of NW Europe: 50 Years of Learning – Proceedings of the 8th Petroleum Geology Conference

M. Bowman
M. Bowman
University of Manchester, UK
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B. Levell
B. Levell
University of Oxford, UK
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The Geological Society of London
Volume
8
ISBN electronic:
9781786203151
Publication date:
January 01, 2018

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