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Gaining insight into corrosion processes from numerical simulations of an integrated iron-claystone experiment

By
Olivier Bildstein
Olivier Bildstein
CEA, DEN, DTN, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance, France
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Jean-Éric Lartigue
Jean-Éric Lartigue
CEA, DEN, DTN, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance, France
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Michel L. Schlegel
Michel L. Schlegel
CEA, DEN, DPC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
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Christian Bataillon
Christian Bataillon
CEA, DEN, DPC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
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Benoît Cochepin
Benoît Cochepin
French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA), DRD, Châtenay-Malabry, France
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Isabelle Munier
Isabelle Munier
French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA), DRD, Châtenay-Malabry, France
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Nicolas Michau
Nicolas Michau
French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA), DRD, Châtenay-Malabry, France
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Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract

Numerical simulations concerning iron–clay interactions in the conditions of an integrated experiment were conducted within a Callovo-Oxfordian claystone block at 90°C for 2 years. The calculations aim at determining the configurations and the parameters for which the simulation reproduce the mineral paragenesis observed at the end of the experiment. This paragenesis suggests that a thin magnetite layer precipitates at the surface of the corroding iron and dissolves on the claystone side to promote precipitation of Fe-silicate and Fe-carbonate minerals. The claystone is also altered close to the interface with iron via a significant precipitation of a Fe-carbonate mineral.

The results obtained using the coupled reactive transport code Crunchflow show that adjusting both the kinetics of magnetite dissolution/precipitation and the properties of the corroded layer (considered as a diffusive barrier) was required in order: (i) to model the destabilization of the magnetite layer formed at the original iron–claystone interface early in the corrosion process and the precipitation of other iron-bearing minerals; and (ii) to isolate the chemical conditions at the iron surface from the conditions in the clay environment in order to favour magnetite precipitation at the iron surface. With these assumptions, the model closely reproduced the mineral paragenesis observed in the experiment.

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Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Radioactive Waste Confinement: Clays in Natural and Engineered Barriers

S. Norris
S. Norris
Radioactive Waste Management, UK
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J. Bruno
J. Bruno
Amphos 21, Spain
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M. van Geet
M. van Geet
ONDRAF/NIRAS, Belgium
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E. Verhoef
E. Verhoef
COVRA, The Netherlands
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Geological Society of London
Volume
443
ISBN electronic:
9781786203267
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

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