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CHAPTER 10: AIRBORNE ELECTROMAGNETIC METHODS

By
G. J. Palacky
G. J. Palacky
Geological Survey of Canada, 601 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0E8.
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G. F. West‡
G. F. West‡
University of Toronto, Department of Physics, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A7.
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Published:
January 01, 1991

INTRODUCTION

The Story of Airborne Electromagnetics

After the end of World War II, the reconstruction of war-ravaged economies fueled a great demand for natural resources. The emerging Cold War caused explorationists to seek secure supplies in countries geographically and politically close to the United States. With vast areas that were then little explored, Canada was one obvious choice. These circumstances provided a great incentive to develop geophysical methods whereby a sparsely populated country, where the climate is often harsh and frigid for part of the year, could be scanned quickly and effectively for deposits of strategic base metals, such as copper, lead, zinc, and nickel. Airborne magnetometer systems that were developed from early war-time prototypes used in submarine detection became widely used in mineral exploration in Canada. However, it soon became obvious that the magnetic information was of more value indirectly in aiding geologic reconnaissance than it was directly in ore exploration. The abundance of magnetic bodies in deformed metamorphic terrains with base metal potential made it difficult to select specific targets for more detailed exploration on the ground. An alternative or additional technique was, therefore, required to carry out prospecting from the air.

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Contents

Investigations in Geophysics

Electromagnetic Methods in Applied Geophysics: Volume 2, Application, Parts A and B

Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
3
ISBN electronic:
9781560802686
Publication date:
January 01, 1991

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