Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

USING ELEMENTAL CHEMOSTRATIGRAPHY ON MID-LATE FRASNIAN PLATFORM-TOP SUCCESSIONS FROM THE LENNARD SHELF OUTCROPS, CANNING BASIN, WESTERN AUSTRALIA

By
Kenneth Ratcliffe
Kenneth Ratcliffe
Chemostrat, Buttington Cross, Welshpool SY21 9BW
Search for other works by this author on:
Ted E. Playton
Ted E. Playton
Tengizchevroil, Atyrau 060011, Kazakhstan
Search for other works by this author on:
Paul Montgomery
Paul Montgomery
Chevron Upstream Europe, Chevron House, Aberdeen AB15 6XL, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
David Wray
David Wray
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 9TB, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Samuel Caulfield-Kerney
Samuel Caulfield-Kerney
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 9TB, UK
Search for other works by this author on:
Eric Tohver
Eric Tohver
School of Earth and Environment, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
Search for other works by this author on:
Roger M. Hocking
Roger M. Hocking
Geological Survey of Western Australia, East Perth, WA 6004, Australia
Search for other works by this author on:
Peter W. Haines
Peter W. Haines
Geological Survey of Western Australia, East Perth, WA 6004, Australia
Search for other works by this author on:
Joseph Kirschvink
Joseph Kirschvink
California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, 1200 E California Blvd.,Pasadena, California 91125 USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Maodu Yan
Maodu Yan
Institute for Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, People’s Republic of China
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract:

High-resolution chronostratigraphic correlation using elemental chemostratigraphy in platform carbonates is typically difficult to achieve. Here, elemental chemostratigraphy is used to correlate between two platform-top, carbonate-dominated field sections from the narrow Lennard Shelf that existed on the NE margin of the Canning Basin, Western Australia, during the mid-late Frasnian. The correlation, constrained by magnetic polarity reversals and physical ground truthing, is based on recognition of distinctive cyclical “stacking patterns” defined by changes in concentrations of the trace element zirconium (Zr). Zr concentrations are controlled by the amount of the heavy mineral zircon in the sediments, which is derived from a terrigenous source and is diagenetically very stable. The stacking patterns in the lower part of the study sections display gradually upward-increasing values of Zr to a maximum, followed by an almost immediate fall to a minimum. In the upper part of the study interval, the cycles are more symmetrical, with both gradually increasing and decreasing portions. The point at which the change in Zr stacking pattern occurs in the two sections is synchronous and occurs in association with a supersequence maximum flooding surface. The correlation based on maximum and minimum Zr values throughout the two sections is demonstrated to be chronostratigraphic by comparison with correlations based upon paleomagnetism and physical ground truthing.

When element ratios commonly used as provenance and paleoclimate proxies are plotted, the variations between closely spaced samples are greater than any systematic variations throughout the study intervals. Therefore, no isochemical chemozones can be defined, implying that during deposition of the study intervals, there were no long-lived changes in sediment provenance or paleoclimate that the elemental chemistry can detect.

The work presented here shows that the standard approach of defining isochemical chemozones for chemostratigraphic correlation is not always appropriate. However, an approach using cyclical changes in elemental variables for chemostratigraphic correlation between two closely spaced sections is chronostratigraphically valid. The greater challenge is in application of the same approach to more widely spaced sections, potentially in different facies of a carbonate setting.

You do not currently have access to this article.
Don't already have an account? Register

Figures & Tables

Contents

Society for Sedimentary Geology

NEWADVANCES IN DEVONIAN CARBONATES: OUTCROP ANALOGS, RESERVOIRS AND CHRONOSTRATIGRAPHY

Society for Sedimentary Geology
Volume
107
ISBN electronic:
9781565763456
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

GeoRef

References

Related

A comprehensive resource of eBooks for researchers in the Earth Sciences

This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

View Article Abstract & Purchase Options

For full access to this pdf, sign in to an existing account, or purchase an annual subscription.

Subscribe Now