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Post-Caledonian extension in the West Norway–northern North Sea region: the role of structural inheritance

By
Haakon Fossen
Haakon Fossen
Department of Earth Science, University of Bergen, Postboks 7803, 5007 Bergen, NorwayMuseum of Natural History, University of Bergen, Postboks 7803, 5007 Bergen, Norway
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Hamed Fazli Khani
Hamed Fazli Khani
Department of Earth Science, University of Bergen, Postboks 7803, 5007 Bergen, Norway
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Jan Inge Faleide
Jan Inge Faleide
Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Postboks 1047, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway
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Anna K. Ksienzyk
Anna K. Ksienzyk
Department of Earth Science, University of Bergen, Postboks 7803, 5007 Bergen, Norway
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W. James Dunlap
W. James Dunlap
University Gas Research, 2888 Pelican Point Circle, Mound, MN 55364, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract:

The northern North Sea region has experienced repeated phases of post-Caledonian extension, starting with extensional reactivation of the low-angle basal Caledonian thrust zone, then the formation of Devonian extensional shear zones with 10–100 km-scale displacements, followed by brittle reactivation and the creation of a plethora of extensional faults. The North Sea Rift-related approximately east–west extension created a new set of rift-parallel faults that cut across less favourably orientated pre-rift structures. Nevertheless, fault rock dating shows that onshore faults and shear zones of different orientations were active throughout the history of rifting. Several of the reactivated major Devonian extensional structures can be extrapolated offshore into the rift, where they appear as bands of dipping reflectors. They coincide with large-scale boundaries separating 50–100 km-wide rift domains of internally uniform fault patterns. Major north–south-trending rift faults, such as the Øygarden Fault System, bend or terminate against these boundaries, clearly influenced by their presence during rifting. Hence, the North Sea is one of several examples where pre-rift basement structures oblique to the rift extension direction can significantly influence rift architecture, even if most of the rift faults are newly-formed structures.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

The Geometry and Growth of Normal Faults

C. Childs
C. Childs
University College Dublin, Ireland
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R. E. Holdsworth
R. E. Holdsworth
University of Durham, UK
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C. A.-L. Jackson
C. A.-L. Jackson
Imperial College, UK
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T. Manzocchi
T. Manzocchi
University College Dublin, Ireland
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J. J. Walsh
J. J. Walsh
University College Dublin, Ireland
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G. Yielding
G. Yielding
Badley Geoscience Ltd, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
439
ISBN electronic:
9781862399716
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

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