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Throw partitioning across normal fault zones in the Ptolemais Basin, Greece

By
Efstratios Delogkos
Efstratios Delogkos
Fault Analysis Group, School of Earth Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
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Tom Manzocchi
Tom Manzocchi
Fault Analysis Group, School of Earth Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
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Conrad Childs
Conrad Childs
Fault Analysis Group, School of Earth Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
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Christos Sachanidis
Christos Sachanidis
Public Power Corporation of Greece, Western Macedonian Lignite Centre, Ptolemais, Greece
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Tryfon Barbas
Tryfon Barbas
Public Power Corporation of Greece, Western Macedonian Lignite Centre, Ptolemais, Greece
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Martin P. J. Schöpfer
Martin P. J. Schöpfer
Department for Geodynamics and Sedimentology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
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Alexandros Chatzipetros
Alexandros Chatzipetros
Department of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
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Spyros Pavlides
Spyros Pavlides
Department of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
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John J. Walsh
John J. Walsh
Fault Analysis Group, School of Earth Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
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Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract:

The total throw across a fault zone may not occur entirely on a single fault strand but may be distributed onto several strands or may be accommodated by distributed deformation within or adjacent to the fault zone. Here we conduct a quantitative analysis of the partitioning of throw into three components, the throw accommodated by: (a) the largest fault strand; (b) subsidiary faults; and (c) continuous deformation in the form of bed rotation in sympathy with the fault downthrow direction. This analysis is applied to seven seismic-scale fault zones at outcrop resolution (maximum throw 50 m) that were mapped over a four-year period during open-cast lignite mining within the late Miocene–Pliocene Ptolemais Basin, West Macedonia, Greece. The analysis shows that the fault zones offsetting the lignite–marl sequence are more localized at higher throws with progressively more of the total throw accommodated by the largest fault strand. Normal drag, which can account for up to 12 m of the total throw, accommodates a lower proportion of the total throw on larger faults. It appears that initial fault segmentation is the main control on the degree of, and spatial variation in, fault throw partitioning.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

The Geometry and Growth of Normal Faults

C. Childs
C. Childs
University College Dublin, Ireland
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R. E. Holdsworth
R. E. Holdsworth
University of Durham, UK
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C. A.-L. Jackson
C. A.-L. Jackson
Imperial College, UK
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T. Manzocchi
T. Manzocchi
University College Dublin, Ireland
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J. J. Walsh
J. J. Walsh
University College Dublin, Ireland
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G. Yielding
G. Yielding
Badley Geoscience Ltd, UK
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The Geological Society of London
Volume
439
ISBN electronic:
9781862399716
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

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