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Chapter 3: Investigation and Use of Surface-wave Characteristics for Near-surface Applications

By
Yixian Xu
Yixian Xu
Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
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Yinhe Luo
Yinhe Luo
Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
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Qing Liang
Qing Liang
Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
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Liming Wang
Liming Wang
Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
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Xianhai Song
Xianhai Song
Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Changjiang River Scientific Research Institute, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
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Jiangping Liu
Jiangping Liu
Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
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Chao Chen
Chao Chen
Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
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Hanming Gu
Hanming Gu
Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
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Published:
January 01, 2010

Abstract

High-frequency surface-wave methods can provide reliable near-surface shear-wave (S-wave) velocity, which is a key parameter in many shallow-engineering applications, groundwater and environmental studies, and petroleum exploration. Recent research and key accomplishments at the China University of Geosciences at Wuhan into nearfield effects on surface-wave analysis provide not only insight into minimum-source geophone offsets required for generating high-quality surface-wave images but also provide a better understanding of the propagation characteristics of seismic wavefields through near-surface materials. New numerical modeling and dispersion-analysis algorithms are key tools used routinely in those studies. The modeling results illustrate very different energy-partitioning characteristics for Rayleigh and Love waves. Using a high-resolution linear Radon transform produces dispersion images with much better resolution and therefore represents a tool for more accurate separation and determination of phase velocities for different modes. Mode separation results in wavefield components that individually possess great potential for increasing horizontal resolution of S-wave velocity-field determinations. Amplitude corrections can significantly improve the accuracy of phase-velocity estimates from mixed-modal wavefields. Results from two simple models demonstrate how dramatic topographic changes can distort wavefields. This finding was the catalyst for suggesting that a topographic correction should be considered for surface-wave data acquired on a rugged ground surface. Phase-velocity inversion is an ill-posed problem. Rayleigh-wave sensitivity analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating S-wave velocities for a model with a low-velocity layer. Constraints in the model space are therefore necessary. Approximating cutoffs could help build a better initial model and provide critical information about the subsurface when higher modes are present.

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Contents

Geophysical Developments Series

Advances in Near-surface Seismology and Ground-penetrating Radar

Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Volume
15
ISBN electronic:
9781560802259
Publication date:
January 01, 2010

GeoRef

References

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