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Book Chapter

Mineralogical characterization of coal samples relevant to coal bed methane porosity and permeability concerns

By
C. Cuff
C. Cuff
1
C&R Consulting Pty Ltd, PO Box 1777, Thuringowa Central, Queensland 4817, Australia
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M. Corkeron
M. Corkeron
1
C&R Consulting Pty Ltd, PO Box 1777, Thuringowa Central, Queensland 4817, Australia
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C. E. Rasmussen
C. E. Rasmussen
1
C&R Consulting Pty Ltd, PO Box 1777, Thuringowa Central, Queensland 4817, Australia
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A. Bush
A. Bush
1
C&R Consulting Pty Ltd, PO Box 1777, Thuringowa Central, Queensland 4817, Australia
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K. Camuti
K. Camuti
2
Lantana Exploration Pty Ltd, PO Box 5026, Townsville, Queensland 4810, Australia
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Published:
January 01, 2017

Abstract

Lower than anticipated gas production rates in coal bed methane (CBM) operations are sometimes related to formation damage in which reduced permeability results from the interaction of bore and fracturing fluids with coal. This study assesses the potential for mineral precipitation to cause formation damage from a Permian coal seam in the Bowen Basin, eastern Australia, using geochemical modelling of coal mineralogy, formation fluid and bore fluid composition. The mineralogical composition of coal was assessed using petrography, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluoresence and electron beam microanalysis. Geochemical modelling of ambient groundwater and drilling fluid interactions with coal samples was undertaken using Geochemist’s WorkBench (GWB). This modelling indicates that likely mineral precipitates/re-precipitates to adversely impact porosity and permeability include a range of clay, carbonate and sulphate minerals. Additionally, these interactions may induce alteration of precursor smectites to new species that reduce permeability. The resultant smectites also have a high propensity for expansion and dispersion in the presence of inappropriate drilling fluids.

Precipitation, expansion and dispersion of these fine-grained minerals may potentially lead to large reductions in permeability, with profound impacts upon gas flow. Indications are that reduced permeability can be mitigated by suitable chemical matching of groundwaters with drilling fluids.

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Contents

Geological Society, London, Special Publications

Geomechanical and Petrophysical Properties of Mudrocks

E. H. Rutter
E. H. Rutter
University of Manchester, UK
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J. Mecklenburgh
J. Mecklenburgh
University of Manchester, UK
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K. Taylor
K. Taylor
University of Manchester, UK
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Geological Society of London
Volume
454
ISBN electronic:
978-1-78620-335-9
Publication date:
January 01, 2017

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