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John Edward Jones (1883–1957): Pioneer in coal-mining safety and generous collector of fossil plants and animals

By
Michael D. Henderson
Michael D. Henderson
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Published:
January 01, 1995

John Edward Jones (1883–1957) was a major figure in the field of coal-mining safety in the United States. Jones served as an Illinois State mine inspector from 1915 to 1917 and as safety engineer for the Old Ben Coal Corporation from 1917 until his retirement in 1952. He pioneered the practice of rock dusting in U.S. mines early in his career at Old Ben. Jones’s contributions to paleobotany were made while he was safety engineer for the Old Ben Coal Corporation. He collected Pennsylvanian fossil plants in southern Illinois, West Virginia, and west-central Arkansas. Jones discovered the first long-leaved specimen of Lepidodendron in 1942. Jones passed away on June 30, 1957, at the age of 73.

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GSA Memoirs

Historical Perspective of Early Twentieth Century Carboniferous Paleobotany in North America

Paul C. Lyons
Paul C. Lyons
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Elsie Darrah Morey
Elsie Darrah Morey
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Robert H. Wagner
Robert H. Wagner
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Geological Society of America
Volume
185
ISBN print:
9780813711850
Publication date:
January 01, 1995

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